We have all been there. As we take note of what date and time each of our classes’ final exams are, we see a pattern. Two, maybe three, of your tests happen to fall on the same day. You begin to panic at the thought of studying for three tests and having to take them one right after another. Not only will you have to try and remember a whole year worth of material for three different subjects, but your brain may likely become fried, affecting how well you do on each test!

So how do you avoid overloading your brain with too much information in too short of a time? Easy! Follow the steps below to properly prepare for when you have multiple final exams on one day:

How to properly study for multiple exams

1. Determine What Will Be On Each Test

It is crucial to outline what will be on each exam. Sometimes, a professor will leave out a chapter or two and you want to note that so you do not waste your time reviewing it. If you end up studying a whole hour for something you didn’t need to know, you will be cutting into the precious time you could have used to study for another test you have that day!

Outlining what is on each test assists you in determining how much time you should study for it. Doing so will help you remarkably when you get to step 3.

2. Rank the Importance of Each Test

Why should you rank the importance of each test? Because even though you may originally schedule an equal amount of time to study for both or all three, if one is worth 20% more of your grade, you may want to contemplate studying extra for that test and less for the other.

How to properly study for multiple exams on one day

There are several factors to take into account when ranking the importance of each exam but the two most significant are:

  • The percent the test is worth out of your final grade

Each teacher you have will make their final exam weighed differently. Your English final may be worth 5% of your total grade while your biology final is worth 40%. When this is the case, devoting more time to studying for your biology exam makes the most sense since doing poorly on this exam verse your English test has a more significant impact on your final grade.

  • The grade you need to maintain or achieve a certain GPA

You have been working for an A in Calculus this whole year, and you need a 90 on your final to achieve this. To get an A in history though, all you need is a 57! Translating this into how long you should study for each test, you should devote further time to studying for Calculus since you need a higher grade to reach your goals!

3. Schedule Out Study Time For Each Test

Lastly, when preparing in advance for multiple exams on one day, you need to schedule out far in advance when you will study for each. Bring into consideration how much time you will need to study for each exam and write down, as precisely as possible, the time slots to review for each one. The reason we say to be as specific as possible is that you will feel more productive and less like you have wasted precious time studying. How can you be precise? Take a look at this example:

On Monday you will do practice essay questions from 6 to 8 PM in chapter four of your history textbook and then from 8:30 PM to 10 PM you will review chapter 7 for your English Exam. You will then go back to studying history for the rest of the night because you know you need a better grade to do well in the class.


***Keep in mind:

None of this will matter if you do not start studying well in advance. Make your schedule as soon as you know when and what will be on each exam. Notably when multiple tests are scheduled for the same day, giving yourself enough time to become prepared is of the utmost importance! Follow these steps whenever you have multiple exams coming up on the same day and before you know it, you will be a master at tackling any amount of studying!

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